Home Prices in Metro Denver Continue to Rise but…..

As a real estate broker and subscriber to our local Multilist service in Denver known as www.REColorado.com (and the site with the most accurate and up-to-date real-estate information) I am provided with information and overviews of the markets on a monthly and annual basis. Thus a year in review and a look back.

In 2017 the average home price in the 12-county metro area rose to $433,000.

For comparison, the average home price in the same area in 2015 was $362,000 and in 2016 was $400,000 or $61,000 and $33,000 gains respectively. Considering inflation has been marginal and barely measurable i.e. below the Federal Reserves target of 2%, the real-dollar gains continue to impress.

Home Sales Volumes: 2017 witnessed the highest number of actual home sales totaling 53,739 totaling $23.3B. In 2016 sales totaled 51,617 units at $20.6B and in 2015 51,510 units sold at $18.6B. Thus a small year over year increase coupled with limited new construction the trend could be considered steady with underlying values exceeding inflation. Of note historically until this past generation home prices nationally usually mirrored inflation with obvious regional anomalies.

As a broker based in Denver’s Cherry Creek Neighborhood and educated as an Urban Planner (graduate of CU Denver) I view the market activity within the City and County of Denver as the overall indicator of the metro area market as the City is the center of commerce, the largest most dense in the metro area, limited land for additional sprawl/growth and other factors.

Interestingly sales volume in Denver did not follow the trend of the overall metro area.

  • In 2017 13,043 homes sold in Denver for $6B. (- over previous two years)
  • In 2016, 13,265 homes sold for $5.6B (+ over previous year)
  • In 2015, 13,053 homes sold for $5.1B

While one may view the reduction in home sales year over year as troubling, I would suggest looking a little deeper. First statistically the actual physical number of homes sales year over year has been steady with almost no statistical variation. During the 3 years the amount of closed volume based on dollars went from $5.1B to $6B this is a major increase in both real dollars and by percentage.

Or in more simplistic terms, the number of homes sold in 2015 and 2017 was about even, a difference of 10 homes less in 2017 versus 2015 HOWEVER the difference in sales dollars during the two-year period went from $5.1B to $6B, a difference of $900M.

Thus, one could surmise values within the City and County of Denver continue to outpace the metro area and demand is outstripping supply. Yet there is an additional variable; Denver in general has more percentage of sales from non-traditional single-family homes i.e. condos and townhomes. Through November of 2017 within Denver 12,168 residential properties sold with 7,602 of transactions recorded in MLS as single-family homes and 4,566 belonging to condos or townhomes.

Over 1/3 of properties sold were in the multifamily space usually a less costly product versus the single-family home (and yes I am aware of multimillion dollar condos in downtown and Cherry Creek yet their volume is somewhat insignificant against the overall sales volume i.e. limited impact on actual sales dollar numbers).

The question or the BUT… in the title is? Can the City and County of Denver sustain this valuation increase or are we looking at a market that may in fact be over-heated and not-sustainable? I do not know the answer as only future activity can answer this question.

HOWEVER 1) If I were considering selling a residence, I would place it on the market sooner than later. 2) Interest rates are forecast to increase due to the stronger national economy thus placing potential pressure on sale prices and 3) reports of decreased in-migration and increased outmigration are troubling yet not surprising as the State has witnessed this in past business cycles i.e. late 1980’s energy bust, mid 1990’s expansion, late 1990’s plateau, mid 2000’s boom and later 2000’s Great Recession.

While I do not believe we are headed into a recession anytime in the immediate future, the growth in real-dollar values coupled with low-inflation is just not sustainable within traditional economic theory (coupled we have very short memories). While some suggest low interest rates have fueled the housing market as it has the equity market; unlike stocks, housing is not liquid. My advice and the future may prove me incorrect however I would suggest a “Yellow Light” proceed with caution and keep looking ahead for potential issues.

 

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Listing in Winter – What Is Going to Maximize the Value

While most homeowners are preparing for the holiday season, those astute owners who are contemplating placing their residence on the market have already contacted brokers with the question “What is going to maximize the value of my sale?”

This is a truly diverse question as each and every home in unique. Yes some would suggest curb appeal (I completely agree however if placing a home on the market in winter before inventory rises, curb appeal especially in snowy climates may be moot). Others mention paint/ carpet and so forth. Yes however exterior no, too cold for paint to adhere and interior great idea but again if north of the Mason-Dixon line, do you really want to air-out the house with sub-freezing temperatures outside?

The following are a few tips I suggest to homeowners contemplating selling sooner than later i.e. placing their homes on the market before the traditional spring rush. Coupled with potential changes in tax laws concerning deductibility and other revisions, this could be a unique selling season coupled being in the 8th year of an expansion which some argue is getting long in the tooth.

As a homeowner, sometimes the work it takes to keep your house in order seems endless. But what if you knew all your improvements were ultimately increasing the value of your property? Read on for a few tips that can help make your home an even better investment.

Opt for replacing instead of remodeling — On average, replacing items in your home yields a better return on investment (ROI) than remodeling projects. Rather than completely redesigning the layout of your living room, consider installing new soundproof windows or switching out your front door. The lead-time can be shorter this time of year as contractors and suppliers are looking for work in tis traditionally slower time of the year for such work.

Keep it simple — Generally, the simpler and cheaper the task, the more likely it is to have a higher ROI. Extravagant jobs such as installing smart appliances in your kitchen or putting in a high-tech security system may not be worth it in the end. Instead, scale back a bit and opt for painting your walls a fresh new color, deep clean your home or add some crown molding. Remember the more particular the taste and wow factor you may be alienating potential buyers. We have a saying in our broker meetings K,I,S,S = Keep It Simple Stupid. While tongue in cheek remember you are the seller, let the next buyer improve or revise to their unique tastes.

Don’t forget the exterior — Curb appeal projects also tend to have a bigger impact. Once again, a little goes a long way, so consider a few strategically placed planters (let the prospective buyer imagine spring flowers or even better illuminated planters, switch out the front door knob/lock-set and replace outdoor lights concerning both design and energy efficiency (LED bulbs have longevity as a benefit). As mentioned above these tasks can be completed during the winter months without too much hassle.

Follow the rules — Before you start making any major changes, be sure to check that you’re abiding by your homeowners association rules and regulations as well as city codes and ordinances. All counties and cities are different, so the best way to find out if you need a permit is to contact your local planning and zoning office. While in a covenant controlled subdivision this is a given even in cities there may be overlay Historic Districts or demand to bring improvements to existing code versus being grandfathered in. My advice, keep all correspondence and permits visible and when the Home Inspector arrives keep copies of all paperwork visible.

Pre-Sale Inspection: I actually did this for my personal resale in the Spring of 2017. I had embarked on a cosmetic renovation as the home was pushing 30+ years old. While still contemporary in design the reality is the laminate counters needed to go, as did the Miami Vice inspired plastic towel bars and so forth. The inspection came out fine however unbeknownst to us the electrical panel we had for the home had been “recalled” in 1990. We purchased the residence in 1989. Long story short we replaced the panel, which would have been flagged by any qualified inspector and thus removed a potential major inspection issue.