The Avenues of Valuation Demarcation Concerning Cherry Creek Residential

For many of us experienced real estate brokers there was a time when Cherry Creek residential was literally split into two distinct neighborhoods, Cherry Creek North (north of 1stAvenue) and Cherry Creek East (south of 1stAvenue).

At present brokers and prospective buyers seem to use the term Cherry Creek to represent the area generally bounded by 6thAvenue on the North, Alameda Avenue on the South (from east of the Mall), University Boulevard on the West and Colorado Boulevard in the East.

While the housing styles are similar throughout the greater Cherry Creek neighborhood including duplexes, row houses and more recently condos and a few very pricy single family homes I have been curious from a broker’s perspective concerning demarcations within the neighborhood.

I decided to analyze the Cherry Creek Neighborhood from Steele Street on the West to Colorado Boulevard on the East, an area that is all residential. I decided to use various avenues as demarcations as based on experience residences north of 3rdAvenue (which has become a bypass for 1stAvenue) seems to always be more expensive and inventory south of 1stAvenue due to size and design is the lowest cost in the area. Thus I wished to validate my experience with statistics of what is on the market at present.

From 3rdAvenue to 6th Avenue -On market: 53 residences

-Avg Layout: 3BD/5BA

-Above Grade SF: 2,812 SF

Avg. Asking: $1,839,000 or $527.86 PSF

-Days on Market: 53

-Average Year of Construction: 2005

From 1stAvenue to 3rd Ave -On market: 47 residences

-Avg Layout: 3BD/4BA

-Above Grade SF: 2,404 SF

-Avg. Asking: $1,049,500 or $500.34 PSF

-Days on Market: 47

-Average Year of Construction: 2004

From 1stAvenue to Alameda Avenue -On market: 26 residences

-Avg Layout: 2BD/3BA

-Above Grade SF: 2,047 SF

-Avg. Asking: $877,450 or $459.10 PSF

-Days on Market: 76

-Average Year of Construction: 2006

Some will suggest the new construction north of 3rdAvenue is skewing the numbers upward and the condos south of 1stAvenue bring down prices. Thus I have also included the asking based on above grade Per Square Foot to provide a more accurate representation.

As one traverses north from Cherry Creek (the waterway) towards 6thAvenue there is a continual uptick in asking prices (and sales data).  North of 6thAvenue the urban fabric changes drastically to majority single-family houses of the Congress Park neighborhood, thus not included in the analysis.

Thus if considering buying or selling, the sweet spot east of Steele Street seems to be between 3rdand 6thAvenues.  Even more impressive purchase or sell just north of the Cherry Creek North Business Improvement District i.e. University to Steele, 3rdto 6thAvenues, just be aware older housing stock and longer days on market yet an impressive $600+ PSF:

From 3rdAvenue to 6thAvenue University Blvd to Steele St. -On market: 11 residences

-Avg Layout: 3BD/4BA

-Above Grade SF: 3,043 SF

Avg. Asking: $1,650,000 or $603.02 PSF

-Days on Market: 89

-Average Year of Construction: 1997

Happy House Hunting

 

 

 

 

 

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Denver Real Estate Market seems to be slowing yet irrational exuberance has not been tempered just yet

Preparing for the Next Cycle

Earlier this week REColorado AKA our Multilist service advised of a “Summer Cooldown” in Metro Denver. Anecdotally we are witnessing an increase in available inventory, longer periods between on market to under contract and pricing that seems to be adjusting to the new reality of lessening demand coupled with higher interest rates.

Thus I was amused to see a new listing in my neighborhood of Cherry Creek, which seems to defy conventional logic. I am not the broker, I am not the owner/seller and I have no idea what the motivation or rationale concerning pricing is HOWEVER I will keep an eye on this one just for my own edification.

While I will not disclose the exact address, the residence is within the 300 block just north of the Business Improvement District aka Cherry Creek North. Many could consider this block prime (I am mixed as it has a concentration of condominiums, curb-cuts and cut-through traffic but I am also trained as an urban planner thus I see what many prospective buyers do not).  Thus owners are literally a few hundred yards away from a wine bar, artisanal coffee, restaurants and so forth. Thus true urban lifestyle with a suburban design and space.

Concerning pricing, here is the history of the residence:

  • February 1999:         Sold for $620,000/$146 PSF ($937,837 in 2018)
  • May 2006:                 Sold for $950,000/$223  ($1,187,527 in 2018)
  • -Of note top of the market, yet good for the seller, 53% gain in 7 years.

 

  • October 2015:           On market for $1,595,000/$376PSF ($1,695,868 in 2018)
  • Did Not Sell: if sold would be a 68% increase over the last sale at the top of the market during the last up-cycle.

 

  • November 2015:       Price reduced to $1,495,000/$352PSF ($1,589,544 in 2018)
  • -Did Not Sell
  • July 2018:                  Place on market for $1,650,000/$388PSF

At $1,650,000 I wish the sellers the best of success. If they are indeed successful selling at asking they will have matched inflation, which is commendable considering, they purchased at the top of the market. Of course when factoring in upkeep, taxes, interest on the mortgage and so forth the calculus changes however they have also had a roof over their heads.

Just for fun I compared the returns above against the S&P 500 with dividend reinvest and not considering inflation, just in real dollars:

Between February 1999 and May 2006

  • The residence appreciated 223%
  • The S&P 500 appreciated 15.5%

Thus residential real estate was the way to invest over those years.

Between May 2006 and June 2018 (most recent S&P Calculator month)

  • The residence (assuming a sale at asking) appreciated 75%
  • The S&P 500 appreciated 172%

During the post Great Recession period we have witnessed the values of real estate and equities rise in tandem. Based in the period from 1999 to 2006 real estate was the better investment. Yet from the Great Recession to today we have witnessed equities and real estate both escalate in tandem. While I am not an economist some would argue bubbles are forming or have formed.

In a Continuing Education class this past week we were collectively discussing the return of non-conforming loans; the ones that brought on the last recession i.e. non-income verification, low or no money down mortgages and other exotic mortgage vehicles. Granted most mortgages are repackaged and sold to investors through various channels.

With interest rates going up and inflation a distinct possibility not to mention trade wars, currency issues (see the Turkish Lira) and investors chasing more aggressive returns…..my advice, sit on the sidelines or better hedge and buckle your seat belts as the old adage goes History Repeats Itself and we all have short memories.

 

 

 

 

Can real estate activity in the affluent Hamptons predict performance in the rest of the country?

The Hamptons on the eastern end and southern fork of Long Island (stretching from Westhampton to Montauk Point) has been a playground for New York City’s wealthy since the Long Island Railroad brought service to the east-end in the later 19thcentury. Known for its fertile soil, the towns of The Hamptons were once known for their agriculture and orientation to the Atlantic Ocean (Montauk and Sag Harbor were Whaling Villages and Bays. By the middle of the 20thCentury the economy of the area changed from agriculture to leisure including artist colonies, wineries and prime oceanfront commanding in the 7 figures.

Real estate sales in resort communities historically slow when there is concern in the economy as this is truly a discretionary spend.  Select brokers with history in the market usually raise concern where their local resort markets begin to show signs of sales weakness (this is also a market where an uptick may predict confidence in the overall economy). News from The Hamptons may be sending a caution signal as follows:

  • Home sales have slowed down this year in the Hamptons bringing the median price below the $1m mark. Second-quarter sales fell 12.8 percent from 2017 levels, according to data prepared for Douglas Elliman by Miller Samuel Real Estate.
  • The median price dropped 5.3 percent to a $975,000, compared with $1.03m one year earlier.

The spring selling (and summer rental Memorial Day to Labor Day) season is usually the high point of the year in the Hamptons, so the drop is stoking concerns that the resort areas of Long Island’s south shore are succumbing to the pressures depressing property activity in other parts of the US. Of note Metro Denver is not immune as inventory is increasing, demand seems to be decreasing and price reductions are becoming common on listings that are reacting to local market conditions.

Rising mortgage rates are increasing costs for homebuyers of all stripes. Higher-end properties have been affected by the 2016 federal tax reform, which imposed new limits on the deductions of mortgage interest and state taxes — the latter a particular concern in high-tax New York and California. Sales have slowed most in the “Hamptons middle” — homes listed in the $1m-$5m range.

Now the Hamptons is a true microcosm when you consider the following:

The inventory of homes listed at more than $4.25m rose 36.5 percent year on year in the second quarter to 329, according to Miller Samuel.  Sales in the luxury market were down 11.6 percent from last year’s level.

According to one broker “We have seen houses listed at $15m brought down to $12m, and maybe trading at $9m or $10m.” The spring saw only one sale closing for more than $20m in the Hamptons — compared with four in the same period one year earlier. The property in East Hampton sold for $40m in April 2018. It had been on the market for two years, and was first listed with a price tag of $69m. That folks is a serious price reduction.