Denver Real Estate Market seems to be slowing yet irrational exuberance has not been tempered just yet

Preparing for the Next Cycle

Earlier this week REColorado AKA our Multilist service advised of a “Summer Cooldown” in Metro Denver. Anecdotally we are witnessing an increase in available inventory, longer periods between on market to under contract and pricing that seems to be adjusting to the new reality of lessening demand coupled with higher interest rates.

Thus I was amused to see a new listing in my neighborhood of Cherry Creek, which seems to defy conventional logic. I am not the broker, I am not the owner/seller and I have no idea what the motivation or rationale concerning pricing is HOWEVER I will keep an eye on this one just for my own edification.

While I will not disclose the exact address, the residence is within the 300 block just north of the Business Improvement District aka Cherry Creek North. Many could consider this block prime (I am mixed as it has a concentration of condominiums, curb-cuts and cut-through traffic but I am also trained as an urban planner thus I see what many prospective buyers do not).  Thus owners are literally a few hundred yards away from a wine bar, artisanal coffee, restaurants and so forth. Thus true urban lifestyle with a suburban design and space.

Concerning pricing, here is the history of the residence:

  • February 1999:         Sold for $620,000/$146 PSF ($937,837 in 2018)
  • May 2006:                 Sold for $950,000/$223  ($1,187,527 in 2018)
  • -Of note top of the market, yet good for the seller, 53% gain in 7 years.

 

  • October 2015:           On market for $1,595,000/$376PSF ($1,695,868 in 2018)
  • Did Not Sell: if sold would be a 68% increase over the last sale at the top of the market during the last up-cycle.

 

  • November 2015:       Price reduced to $1,495,000/$352PSF ($1,589,544 in 2018)
  • -Did Not Sell
  • July 2018:                  Place on market for $1,650,000/$388PSF

At $1,650,000 I wish the sellers the best of success. If they are indeed successful selling at asking they will have matched inflation, which is commendable considering, they purchased at the top of the market. Of course when factoring in upkeep, taxes, interest on the mortgage and so forth the calculus changes however they have also had a roof over their heads.

Just for fun I compared the returns above against the S&P 500 with dividend reinvest and not considering inflation, just in real dollars:

Between February 1999 and May 2006

  • The residence appreciated 223%
  • The S&P 500 appreciated 15.5%

Thus residential real estate was the way to invest over those years.

Between May 2006 and June 2018 (most recent S&P Calculator month)

  • The residence (assuming a sale at asking) appreciated 75%
  • The S&P 500 appreciated 172%

During the post Great Recession period we have witnessed the values of real estate and equities rise in tandem. Based in the period from 1999 to 2006 real estate was the better investment. Yet from the Great Recession to today we have witnessed equities and real estate both escalate in tandem. While I am not an economist some would argue bubbles are forming or have formed.

In a Continuing Education class this past week we were collectively discussing the return of non-conforming loans; the ones that brought on the last recession i.e. non-income verification, low or no money down mortgages and other exotic mortgage vehicles. Granted most mortgages are repackaged and sold to investors through various channels.

With interest rates going up and inflation a distinct possibility not to mention trade wars, currency issues (see the Turkish Lira) and investors chasing more aggressive returns…..my advice, sit on the sidelines or better hedge and buckle your seat belts as the old adage goes History Repeats Itself and we all have short memories.

 

 

 

 

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