Millennials Understand Opportunity Truly Knocks Beyond Central Denver

We seem to be in a unique environment concerning the national housing market as both buyers and sellers are excited. For sellers, record high prices are becoming the norm even in the rising interest rate environment. Buyers even though confronted with the challenging lack of inventory are strengthening the market due to confidence and the desire to lock in still historically attractive interest rates.

The above is based on the monthly Fannie Mae Home Purchase Sentiment Index® (HPSI)increased by 2 percentage points in January to 82.7, ending a five-month decline. Some of the highlights from the report include:

  • The net share of Americans who say it is a good time to buy a house fell by 3 percentage points to 29%, matching the survey low from May and September 2016.
  • The net percentage of those who say it is a good time to sell rose by 2 percentage points to 15%.
  • The net share of Americans who say that home prices will go up increased by 7 percentage points in January to 42%.
  • The net share of those who say mortgage rates will go down over the next 12 months remained constant this month at -55%.
  • The net share of Americans who say they are not concerned about losing their job rose 1 percentage point to 69%.
  • The net share of Americans who say their household income is significantly higher than it was 12 months ago rose 5 percentage points to 15% in January, reversing the drop in December.

Now concerning millennials, according to Fannie Mae research, more are purchasing and starting new households. While the Great Recession may have delayed purchases; millennials are now more confident concerning job security translating to an increased in marriages and parenthood (common during stronger economic cycles, nothing new there).

Yet of interest due to the expensive reality of city-centric residences some millennials are exploring and purchasing in the suburbs where values are generally more affordable. I have witnessed this myself concerning millennial clients looking beyond central Denver. Neighborhoods of interest include:

Southmoor Park: Lots of home and land for the spend. Also close enough to Light Rail Station at Hampden and I-25 allowing easy access to downtown and easy drive to DTC. With Whole Foods and new restaurants options on the Hampden Corridor, becoming popular.

North Englewood: Just south of the Denver border clients are looking at Englewood (north of Hampden Avenue) as a substitute for Platte Park especially adjacent to S. Broadway which continues to diversity businesses now catering to clients within their immediate neighborhood versus the traditional commuter traffic. Also a few good options for fans of Mid Century Modern who may not wish to pay the prices associated with Krisana Park.

Arvada: With neighborhoods close to the light rail line and with a new urbanism orientation, millennials are finding Olde Town Arvada has urban qualities found in areas such as Old SouthPearl, Old South Gaylord and other urban enclaves. With the easy commute to Denver via rail or car and lower prices, demand will soon outstrip supply.

Westminster: As with Arvada, the new rail line is opening up opportunities for those who desire more affordable housing, an ongoing renovation/development of a town center and easy access to the Broomfield office parks.

Edgewater: For those who have been priced out of Sloans Lake, Edgewater offers a respite within a stone’s throw geographically. With a charming commercial street, small town feel yet within easy viewing distance of the downtown skyline and a nice diverse housing stock, do not be surprised if this hidden enclaves demographics see a dramatic shift in years to come skewing towards younger buyers and families.

With this millennial flight to the suburbs what is going to happen to the inner-city? In essence the millennials are basically skipping a step i.e. usually starting in the inner-city and then moving to the suburbs for access to additional square footage, suburban schools and so forth. While these areas were once car-dependent, the expansion of RTD’s rail lines are making these suburbs once considered commuter oriented into their own attractive and thriving towns.

Yet I am far from concerned about the City of Denver. While I have some personal issues with the desire to increase density in some neighborhoods; Denver will always remain in demand due to geography, diversity of housing stock and varied amenities from cultural to financial i.e. lower water bills, low-taxes, municipal services and so forth.

My one concern for Denver is this rush to increase density. Full disclosure I am a native New Yorker thus I understand density having been raised in within an apartment building on the 20th floor and taking the subway to and from school. I am also educated as an urban planner. I view the cranes on the skyline of Cherry Creek, west of the Denver Country Club and other areas and I have three questions:

1) Is there truly longer-term demand for all the new multi-family buildings?

2) If in fact there is demand and zoning is keeping up with this demand, will our infrastructure follow suit i.e. roads, mass-transit, pedestrian corridors, dedicated bike lanes?

3) Are we remaking the inner-city of Denver unaffordable akin to San Francisco, New York, Paris, London and other cities in which the income gap is severely pronounced. These were cities which used to have a true diversity of cultures, incomes and employment and now have become playgrounds of the wealthy or long-time owners.

 

 

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