Does the Seller Really Want to Sell

While the metro Denver market continues to hum along and there are a few “blockbuster” sales on the upper-end, anecdotally I am seeing signs of stress especially on the upper-end of the market. Some listings are coming on at inflated/fantasy prices and within 1-2 weeks a price reduction. Granted some reductions are more symbolic i.e. still priced above market and I never fault anyone for holding out hope of that blockbuster sale. However as an experienced broker I look for various signs showing that a seller is serious and motivated.

Yet first some signs advising the seller may not be so serious:

Will Not Close until Replacement Property Secured: In such a situation the seller is driving the transaction. You as buyer are in a holding pattern literally beholden to the seller and their timing and wish-list concerning finding a replacement property which in a hot market may not be so easy. In commercial transactions this can be a common occurrence and is a tactic used in 1031 Exchanges. Concerning traditional residential I would be more cautious. Not to dissimilar from a reverse contingency i.e. usually buyer will purchase contingent on the sale of their existing property. Instead here the seller will sell and close once their replacement residence is secured.

Holdover or Leaseback in Excess of 30 days: Holdover i.e. occupancy once the house is sold and closed is not so uncommon. I usually suggest 30 days or less; there is even a pre-printed Colorado Real Estate Commission Form known as the Post Closing Occupancy Agreement for such an event. For longer periods (and again if you are an investor the criteria may be different) I would be more cautious. Basically the seller is looking to cash out and lease their house back. I have been involved with situations concerning relocation when this is quite accepted. However barring a relocation situation my immediate concern is for the buyer. The seller is desiring to cash out and lease back. Again in commercial real-estate not uncommon, in residential may indicate seller may believe market is adjusting downward and desires to cash out at prevailing market conditions and assumes paying rent is safer than a mortgage associated with a downward trending asset. Yes the seller may need the cash out of the house; there are additional options from HELOC’s to Reserve Mortgages, thus a sale is more drastic.

Again the above are basic guidelines, not the gospel and each situation is truly unique.

The signs seller is truly serious:

Buy Me: Even in a hot market a property may go through multiple price reductions. Granted this could be an indicator the listing was over-priced to begin with. However when coupled with other indicators i.e. priced well-below market value, being offered “as-is” or desiring a cash transaction can possibly construe the seller is very serious.

Of note, be forewarned as some brokers will purposely list a property at below-market to instill excitement of prospective buyers and more importantly bids and offers. In a hot market such a tactic can be a benefit to the seller. However in a market trending downward such a strategy may place the seller in a losing situation i.e. full price offer at the below-market price and by not accepting barring contingencies the broker may demand a commission if seller does not sell.

Curb Appeal or Lack Thereof: Anyone who has owned a home knows landscaping takes time and money (even DIY’s i.e. materials, water, maintenance). While brokers usually advise an investment in curb appeal, a seller who may not have the time or capital to attend to the landscaping may be showing signs of motivation by their inaction and lack of investment. Such signs I look for include:

  • Overgrown or dead lawn/shrubs/flower beds.
  • Weeds and other decay i.e. trash, dead leaves, and overgrowth.
  • Newspapers that have not been picked up and/or fliers in the door.

Such signs could also point to an absentee owner, landlord or similar situation. I have used such visual cues to procure listings by researching public records and other databases.

Interior is Half Lived In: Hey I am all for staging and a staged house usually suggests a motivated seller i.e. the investment in staging. However dig deeper especially if you believe the house continues to be owner/seller occupied. Are the closets ½ empty? Is the furniture mismatched or haphazardly placed? Are walls showing signs of art having been removed and not replaced? Such indicators may indicate divorce, destitution, already moved out or similar. Usually when a home is in such condition, the seller is motivated. Please note there is a difference between purging and having moved on.

Of note, in Japan in the 1980’s some listings were not only staged but also included a live multi-generational family pursuing their daily routine during open-houses to show how the home functions and meets the needs of a multigenerational family as buyer. Trust me somewhat disturbing seeing children doing their homework during an open house yet also true early adopters of the precursor to virtual reality.

Family Dynamics have Changed: I see this quite often; the signs may include a child’s crib in one of the social rooms i.e. living, dining, home office or similar. Or on other side of the spectrum oxygen tank or other medically oriented items. Such indicators may suggest a new addition(s) to the family from a child to an aging parent or illness. This may be a situation where the owners desire to move for more space to accommodate and thus at present a not optimum living situation.

Estate Sale: Usually estate sales are when the owner passes and/or the present sellers are by descent. Such sellers may be more motivated to unload the property for various motivations from estate tax liability to not desiring the upkeep and maintenance. In the Denver Multilist there is a check box for type of seller and one option is Estate. If your locale does not indicate such type of seller and it is a deed of trust state, investigate what type of deed is being offered. Is it a Personal Representative Deed or similar? May be an estate. Of course some experienced brokers review obituaries and similar to look for listings; an old pastime in New York City which is practiced to this day (not to mention treating estate lawyers to lunch).

Providing Too Much Unrequested Information: In Colorado we have what is known as the Seller Property Disclosure, a 7+ pages form executed by sellers to provide information to the best of their knowledge concerning the residences condition and state of repair. Of note I advise seller clients to be truthful and honest as its both a legal and ethical course of action not to mention most buyers will engage the services of a home inspector prior to closing.

However some clients can be more forthcoming and mention issues and potential remedies before being prompted. In general I usually caution sellers to be circumspect in what they mention i.e. “We were going to install an on-demand hot water heater but went with the conventional as it was cheaper and we did not want to invest any additional money into the house”. This tells a buyer the seller while preparing for sale went for near-term economics versus cost-savings over the long-term. I am guilty of this myself. In the sale of my house I advised the sellers concerning a secondary bathroom; if they ever plan to renovate to consider changing the dual knobs to a single-lever. Was I disclosing too much? Maybe; however I advised since we did not use that particular bathroom we never did the upgrade; something to consider for their larger household and lifestyle.

The House Is Empty: Rarely do homes show better when vacant (that is why we have staging as an image is worth 1,000 words). In reality an empty property may indicate the seller has moved on. Yet continuing to retain ownership the empty home does incur carrying costs even if there is no mortgage i.e. real estate taxes, upkeep, insurance and so forth. Thus the seller may be willing to be more flexible knowing their for-sale asset is depleting capital while on the market.

Granted some homes are staged and again this may be a sign the seller is serious as staging is not inexpensive. In some markets we are now witnessing virtual staging i.e. computer generated staging to the benefit of on-line marketing, again a picture is worth 1,000 words. One company has brought the cost of staging down with inflatable furniture; just don’t sit on the props. Of note, a broker trick to show the scale of a bedroom, set up four to six boxes for support, add a camping air mattress, cover with a bedspread and pillows. The result an instantly staged and scaled bedroom.

Happy House Hunting

The Holiday Chalet a Fixture on East Colfax Ave Changes Hands

The well-known landmark in operation for 65 years sold for $165,000 per key

Denver, CO— April, 2017 — Antonoff & Co. Brokerage Inc. in partnership with Engel & Volkers Vail is pleased to announce the successful sale of The Holiday Chalet Victorian Bed & Breakfast located at 1820 E. Colfax Avenue, Denver CO. A fixture on East Colfax Ave, The Holiday Chalet, a former single-family mansion has operated as a hospitality use for 58+ years. The new owners plan to continue the hospitality use with a 21st Century orientation.

According to Broker Associate Jeffrey Hirschfeld of Antonoff & Co. Brokerage Inc. “The Holiday Chalet is a unique opportunity as the building housed 10 units, all with en-suite bathrooms and 9 with kitchenettes. We had interest from varied prospects interested in hospitality, redevelopment into micro units and potential live/work space. The continued evolution of East Colfax coupled with demand secured a strong sales price.”

The Holiday Chalet structure dates to 1896 originally built as a 3-story single-family residence aka The Henry Bohn Mansion. In the mid-1920’s the building was renovated to an apartment use and converted to a hotel operation in 1952.

What makes the building so special is the design details” Said Joseph Sobin, CNE Broker Associate with Engel & Volkers Vail adding “Much of the original woodwork and stained glass has been retained and resorted including a wood framed original Tiffany designed window illuminating the northern exposure lobby and reception areas. Throughout the Holiday Chalet there are details and materials which indicate the original mansion was on par with the opulence and design of the mansions built along Denver’s Gold Coast at the turn of the 20th Century”.

The sale, which closed in less than 90 days on the market provides evidence of the continued resurgence of the E. Colfax corridor. The prime location within close proximity of the Denver CBD generated strong interest from a wide range of prospective buyers. The new owners plan to continue as a hospitality use with renovations and service oriented to the 21st century traveler. Yesteryear design coupled with tomorrow’s conveniences.

Full disclosure, Joseph Sobin, author of this blog and broker participated in the sale as co-listing broker.