Head and Shoulder Pattern in Denver Real Estate

As readers of my blog know I am somewhat a statistician as I look at various statistical measurements including the well respected Case-Shiller index concerning housing costs. Please note statistics are similar to an appraisal; they are a look back and not necessarily a look forward. I also believe history repeats itself as I have been a broker for 20+ years and have watched with interest the effects of business cycles on our real estate market.

Please note I am not advocating the following analysis concerning a Head and Shoulders pattern adopted from the stock market HOWEVER housing prices in general trend with the stock market. Thus reviewing the latest statistics and graph patterns I noticed a head and shoulders pattern-taking place in the Denver (and other) housing markets: The following is a graphic of a Head And Shoulders Bottom as related to equities:

H_and_s_bottom_new

Per Wikipedia: This formation (Head & Shoulders Bottom) is simply the inverse of a Head and Shoulders Top and often indicates a change in the trend and the sentiment. The formation is upside down in which volume pattern is different from a Head and Shoulder Top. Prices move up from first low with increase volume up to a level to complete the left shoulder formation and then falls down to a new low. It follows by a recovery move that is marked by somewhat more volume than seen before to complete the head formation. A corrective reaction on low volume occurs to start formation of the right shoulder and then a sharp move up that must be on quite heavy volume breaks though the neckline.

Another difference between the Head and Shoulders Top and Bottom is that the Top Formations are completed in a few weeks, whereas a Major Bottom (Left, right shoulder or the head) usually takes a longer, and as observed, may prolong for a period of several months or sometimes more than a year.

Screen Shot 2017-08-11 at 8.41.30 AM

In May 2017 according to the Case Shiller index the average home price in Denver reached $456,100 which is 41%+ higher than the previous peak experienced in Denver in August 2006 which many will remember was the pinnacle before descent into the Great Recession.

While the graph is not the easiest to comprehend yet the visual is strikingly similar to the Head and Shoulders Bottom, the following is the pricing and trend over a 17-year period, which I have mentioned in previous blog posts including the pricing history and activity of a home in Country Club.

  • 17 years: Average Annual Increase: 5.8%
  • 10 Years: Average Annual Increase: 4.6%
  • 3 Years Average Annual Increase: 10%
  • 1 Year Average Annual Increase: 7.9%

The average cost of a home in Denver throughout the past 17 years:

  • 2000: $230,000
  • 2007: $313,500
  • 2010: $290,000
  • 2014: $350,900
  • 2016: $422,800
  • 2017: $456,100

Are times and trends different from the Great Recession at present? Yes. Lending standards have tightened, sub-prime lending seems to be under control and we continue to be in a Goldilocks Interest Rate environment.

However just on a business cycle trend I have some concern and this does not include outside influences i.e. saber rattling concerning North Korea which impacted the equity markets worldwide yesterday with the largest point downtown since May 17th, 2017.

I am not a market forecaster however based on the statistics and graphs presented in this blog my level of concern for a retrenchment in prices is ratcheting upward. We are witnessing price adjustments in the upper-end of the market and if interest rates were to increase we would see affordability challenged further and average prices go down. Not necessity a negative as we continue to be in a seller’s market and average buyers are challenged concerning affordability and inventory, not a positive long-term trend for our housing market. I am not making any predictions, just showing statistics and voicing some concern.

 

 

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Denver Now 3rd for Year over Year Price Appreciation. Sustainable?

The most recent Case-Shiller Index for Metro Denver shows continued strength in our market which is now at #3 behind Seattle and Portland for price appreciation. Within the last year the price appreciation for Denver has been 7.9%, which is very, very healthy (nationally the increase was 5.6%). Even more interesting is the following statistic from the report: “Denver’s Case-Shiller home price index in May rose to a new record of 198.32. That means that local home resale prices averaged 98.32 percent higher than they were in the benchmark month of January 2000, based on non-seasonally-adjusted data.”

Yes as a broker I should be celebrating. However I have been curious about business and real estate cycles as I have learned over the year’s lessons from history should be respected.

Case in point a charming house on a nice corner lot in one of Central Denver’s most desirable neighborhoods recently came in the market. The house is of a desirable size with 2,000 SF above grade and a fully finished basement with 1,300 SF. In addition the home is located within a most in-demand public elementary school which is within walking distance.

I decided to do a title search to see the activity on this house as it relates to the Case-Shiller index. Fortunately I could go as far back as 1992. Here is the history based on public records, please note the information reads as follows

Transaction/Date/ Price/Gain/Loss over Prior Transaction in $/%/ From 1992/ % Int. Rate:

  • Sold June 1992 – $225,000 Average 30 Yr. Mortgage Rate = 8.51%
  • Sold Nov 1993 – $238,500 + $13,500 or +6% gain/ 30 Yr. = 7.16%
  • Sold Aug 1999 – $480,000 + 241,500 or +101% / 113% gain from 1992/ 30 Yr. 7.94%
  • Sold Oct 2003 – $690,000 + $200,000 or +43% / 206% gain from 1992/ 30 yr. 5.95%
  • Sold Sep 2007 – $825,000 + $135,000 or +20%/ 260% gain from 1992 / 30 yr. 6.38%
  • Foreclosed Nov 2010/ 30yr. 4.3%
  • Sold Aug 2011 for $625,000 (- $200,000) or (-24%)/ 170% gain from 1992/30 yr. 4.27%

Placed on market July 2017 for $1,950,000/ 30 Yr. 3.88%

Assuming a sale for $1,900,000 + $1,275,000 or 204% Gain/ 740% gain from 2002

Thus from 1992 to 2007 which many consider the pinnacle of the last market upturn before the Great Recession, the gain over the 15 years equaled $600,000 or 73%.

In the three years from the pinnacle of the market to subsequent foreclosure in 2010 and sale the following year in 2011 the home lost $200,000 or 24% in value in 4 years. Yet from 1992 the increase still equals $400,000 or a 200%+ gain over 19 years.

If this home sells for close to asking in the 6 years of most recent ownership, looking at a $1,275,000 gain or $204% over their purchase and 700+% over the 1992 sales price.

Again I assume there have been renovations. Of note I am not factoring inflation as the $225,000 in June 1992 would equate to $393,000 in 2017.

However if one were to graph the history of this home it is unique as it shows true cycles in the market. In 1994 Denver and all of Colorado was experiencing a similar economic boom as we are enjoying at present. Granted the present expansion cycle is exacerbated coming off the Great Recession however I continue to argue fundamental business cycles have not ended.

Yes we are in a Goldilocks fiscal environment with historically low interest rates. I purposely included the average interest rates at the time of each transaction based on the 30 yr. fixed rate. Also with unemployment at record lows eventually we should see inflation tick up. During times of inflation housing generally increases in value HOWEVER when mortgage interest rates increase there is historically an inverse relationship i.e. rates go up on mortgages prices can come down concerning housing as more of the monthly is debt service.

Thus one may conclude the phenomenal increases in values may be attributable to the influx of capital and population to Denver, attractive pricing when compared to coastal cities and all coupled with cheap borrowing costs. However is this growth sustainable?

Ask me in the next 12-18 months.

Personally I would be a seller at present and only a buyer assuming a longer-term hold i.e. over 3-5 years at minimum while locking in the low-interest rates. Just my humble opinion.