What a Hole in the Ground May Indicate About the Health of the Real Estate Market

I have lived in the Cherry Creek North neighborhood long enough to watch our neighbors to the south i.e. Cherry Creek East blossom into a diverse neighborhood from rental and condo high-rises to townhomes, mid-height rentals, an assisted living facility and oh so many townhomes built usually as rows versus the duplexes you see north of 1t Avenue (as most of Cherry Creek East is zoned Planned Unit Development).

On my walk this afternoon I was stopped in my tracks at The Cassidy (basically S. Harrison Street between Cedar and Bayaud Avenues). I had watched over the past weeks as the earthmovers excavated for the foundation with the assumption of full ceiling height basements. The units directly to the south seem to have sold and thus now a larger lot with plans for 37 units and a well-known broker who represents many new developments in the area as listing broker and sales point person.

What stopped me in my tracks was not the glossy marketing sign; it was what someone attached to it. Someone had cut out and highlighted the foreclosure notice on the property dated 9/28/17 from The Denver Post. Yes, the foreclosure notice.

The Cassidy Foreclosure Notice
Someone posted the foreclosure notice as published in The Denver Post (9/28/17) on the marketing sign.

While foreclosures were front and center during the Great Recession of a few years back, lately all we see are cranes on the horizon and continue talk about growth and the desire for Amazon to locate HQ2 to Denver.

Yet maybe it is irrational exuberance rearing its ugly head or our desire not to confront reality. I have been forecasting a downturn documented in this blog for months. Even the Wall Street Journal mentions rent-concessions and other activities, which may suggest not only is the boom loosing steam but also we may be moving into an overbuilt scenario.

Yes record prices were recently paid for the Steele Creek Apartments in Cherry Creek (of note the original developer Eric H. Bush who assembled the land on which Steele Creek was developed recently committed suicide). While I am not suggesting any nexus, I would just be concerned when we have record sale prices and 7 blocks east a foreclosure on massive lot on which 37 for-sale units were proposed.

Just food for thought.

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Does the Record Sale of Steele Creek Apartments Cherry Creek Signal a Top

I remember when Steele Creek Apartments were proposed for the Southeast corner of Steele Street and 1st Avenue, at the time occupied by a few Class C buildings and a discount dry cleaner.

With the news hitting that the building set a new record on a per-unit basis for the sale of an apartment building of $570,000 per unit does the valuation make sense even considering future equity appreciation?

Working in both New York and Denver such numbers are not surprising as in NYC such a deal would be a steal especially for a newer construction building minus any rental controls, statutory affordable housing or long-term leases. Yet Denver is not New York.

Granted we have seen other close to blockbuster deals in Central Denver concerning rental properties as excerpted below from my morning daily read BusinessDen including but not limited to:

However are these deals good money-chasing returns, which are far from guaranteed? One could argue Denver at present is in an up cycle with record high rents (even though some buildings are offering rental incentives). Yet I am concerned as follows:

The New Rental buildings are oriented to deluxe and luxury tenants offering studio to 2-bedroom configurations limiting marketability to affluent singles and couples. In New York and San Fracisco the highest prices on bith a per-unit and PSF basis are “family-oriented” apartments considering of usually 2-4 bedrooms and minimum 2 bathrooms where a family can be reside comfortably.

Is there a glut on the horizon in the marketplace? Between Lower Downtown and Cherry Creek along the Speer Boulevard/1st Ave. corridor we are witnessing new buildings sprouting up like weeds with the assumption that demand for luxury rental apartments will continue unabated.

The Millennial Generation Will Age: I am witnessing it in my real estate practice; millennial’s are pairing up, starting families and due to price pressure are looking at homes to purchase in outlying Denver and suburban neighborhoods; not much different how Brooklyn became chic when Manhattan rents became unaffordable (with some help from Michelle Williams and Maggie Gyllenhaal and for us old timers, Patty Duke lived in Brooklyn Heights).

If the Influx Slows Who Will Rent these Apartments? While certain buildings have a reputation for attracting empty nesters (25 Downing Street) and those whose change in lifestyle may necessitate move to an apartment from a home (The Seasons at Cherry Creek), while renting is an option, many opt to purchase. Again anecdotally I know two empty-nest couples who moved from Country Club to condos, one in downtown, one in Cherry Creek.

What is Trendy Today is a Maintenance Headache Tomorrow: We see this in buildings throughout Capitol Hill, the party rooms with the naugahyde chairs on brass wheels and the pool table that has seen better days or the pool which requires constant expensive maintenance and upkeep.

While I understand the attractiveness of the cost on a per unit basis when compared to other in-demand cities including San Francisco, The Northeast Corridor (from Boston to Washington DC), Los Angeles and so forth those cities have physical geographic constraints and draconian rent-control laws which circumvents true market supply and demand laws thus raising rents on the free-market inventory.

Thus I do not see how the numbers work based on existing rental rates even when factoring in equity appreciation and nominal inflation. Granted there is always the option of conversion from rental to condo. The process includes upgrading the common areas and interiors of unitsoriented to the for-sale market AND developing a legal condominium, HOA and so forth. Not unheard of in Denver i.e. The Barclay (which when first converted were offered with developer backed below-market financing), Brooks Towers and other buildings have experienced such conversion.

However at present transaction cost per unit, is there really the demand for the $600K one bedroom condominium? We have seen such sales in smaller boutique developments including 250 Columbine (which does have a Starbucks on the retail level), but it is rare and definitely a niche market.

From experience such condos sell to those looking for a pied-a-terre in which their primary residence is NOT Denver or potential investment however for a decent cash-on-cash return the rents do not justify the selling price.

In New York City developers take the opposite approach developing condos and if the plan if sales do not meet the pro-forma then re-branded as a rental with the option to sell individual units when the market strengthens.

At present looking at prices coupled with construction activity I would be “short-selling” the apartment market if such a vehicle existed. Long-term I may be proven wrong, however within the three-five year time horizon and even in the present as leasing entities/developers are offering rent concessions, I would be more concerned versus excited at the blockbuster record prices being recorded.

 

 

 

 

As Real Estate Transactions Slow Take A Seasonal Breather Bring in Some Hygge

With the Fall Season chill in the air a perfect opportunity to add some levity to my blog and discuss the somewhat abstract concept of Hygge. I was actually introduced to the term while visiting Copenhagen during late November. It was quite chilly; the humidity literally penetrated multiple layers of clothing (of note I stopped in H&M for a scarf, hat and gloves set) and mid-day twilight led to early darkness due to the city’s northern latitude.

Yet the hotels, restaurants, shops and private residences (of note, if visiting must experience Dine with the Danes) had a warmth that is described as Hygge. Even the streets had a coziness as the street lamps were secondary (bulb hanging in the middle of the right-of-way) to the illumination emitted by the large candles in the windows of shops and restaurants literally bathing the narrow pedestrian oriented streets in candle light.

Thus as our days here in the northern hemisphere get shorter I wanted to share te following insights as you prepare for the autumn and winter to come (and if planning on placing your residence on the market during the Fall/Winter when inventory is limited, great options below concerning staging beyond the cookies in the oven..

You know that cozy contentment that comes with spending a Sunday morning reading a good book and drinking a cup of hot tea? There’s actually a Danish word for it. Hygge (pronounced hue-guh) is a feeling described as charming, comfortable, familiar and simple. Sound nice? Keep reading to learn how you can incorporate this hug-like feeling into your home.

Bring the Outdoors In — Embracing the calm that comes with nature is one aspect of hygge. You can do this by revamping your color scheme with earth tones, adding various natural elements and textures or simply burning a forest-scented candle. Personally I enjoy the scent of the mountain towns in winter, a mix of wood-burning and pine.

Maximize Your Light — The more natural light you can bring into your home, the better. Pick window treatments that will allow as much light as possible or go with no treatments at all. Instead, add a film to your window to reduce solar heat and maintain privacy. In Colorado we are blessed with 300+ days of sunshine a year coupled with mild winters.

Find Your Center — Even if you don’t have a fireplace i.e. living in a condo or apartment, moving your furniture around a primary focal point, like a coffee table or book shelf, will add a sense of comfort to your space. Arrange your furniture in a semicircle and watch how naturally conversation flows when you have guests over. If you wish to splurge consider building a mantle and a faux fireplace and of those who have a closed up flue, consider a candle arrangement in the fireplace.

Create a Relaxation Station — Designate a specific nook in your home where you can go to decompress and recharge. String up some lights, arrange some candles and have a soft blanket and quality chocolate nearby. Trust me one can park and visit Godiva and make it out within one hour at The Cherry Creek Shopping Center or consider Endstrom on University Blvd in Cherry Creek North.

With this notion of coziness built into their way of life, it’s no wonder the Danish are considered among the happiest people in the world (even though their tax rates is by our standards are quite high). Try implementing a few of these hygge tips to create a sense of well-being and contentment in your home.

 

 

 

Why Continued Positive Comments About the Housing Market Scare Me

As a broker I make my living assisting clients purchasing and divesting of their real estate holdings. In this market of ever seemingly positive news I should be thrilled. Yet as a 20+-year broker licensed in two states I have some serious concerns on the macro level, which truly reverberates beyond home sale statistics.

At present the Denver market as well as the US market looks very healthy. Demand is high, employment and wages are growing, and mortgage rates are low.

However based on reports out this past week, if one reads between the numbers and taking into account history and growth trends, the market is quite challenged. Not at present but longer term we may be setting ourselves up for a dramatic shift in the economy and wealth accumulation.

There is continued strength in the overall national housing market with prices 6% higher than the same period one year ago. Some local markets continue to show double-digit growth in prices. Metro Denver’s year over year was 7.9%. Such numbers are driven by the simple law of supply and demand and specifically the limited supply at the lower end of the market. Thus lower end homes are witnessing significant price appreciation due to more competition while higher end listings are languishing or having price reductions (see my last blog).

While I have mixed feelings on Zillow and similar sites, their insights and digesting of data is always an interesting read: “It sets up a situation in which the housing market looks largely healthy from a 50,000-foot view, but on the ground, the situation is much different, especially for younger, first-time buyers and/or buyers of more modest means,” wrote Svenja Gudell, chief economist at Zillow in a response to the latest home-price data. “Supply is low in general, but half of what is available to buy is priced in the top one-third of the market.”

So why is the inventory and supply on the lower end of the market so challenged? A few reasons and many can be seen in your local neighborhood:

Conversion of Inventory from Home Ownership to Rental: During the Great Recession which many of us brokers also call “a housing crash”, investors from large hedge funds to Ma and Pa purchased 100’s of thousands of foreclosed properties. While some were fix and flips, the vast majority became income-producing rentals. At present according to the U.S. Census there are 8 million more renter-occupied homes than there were in 2007.

Granted some renters may be scared off from purchasing and while the investors could cash out and after paying simple capital gains have a nice windfall, at present the cash-flow on rentals is one of the most attractive investments in the market coupled with the underlying equity appreciation of the real estate; thus the motivation to sell is limited. In turn lower end and moderate homes are not coming on the market in meaningful volume.

New Home Sales are Down: In August 2017 there was a 3.4% monthly drop concerning new home sales. If demand is so strong shouldn’t new home sales be booming? Well, it is again simple economics and in this case pricing.

In August just 2 percent of newly built homes sold were priced under $150,000, and just 14 percent priced under $200,000.

Builders advise they desire to build more affordable homes yet profit margins or the lack of is causing constraints. Builders blame the higher costs of land (exurbs with lower cost land is falling out of favor with 1st time home buyers who desire to be closer to urban centers), labor, materials and regulatory compliance i.e. building and zoning codes (and this is before the hurricanes decimated Houston, southern Florida, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands which will demand laborers and materials to rebuild leading to eventual inflation in those industries and supply chains.

One could argue that market forces will eventually realign the housing market. Yet when this will happen is anyone’s guess. Considering we are still in a “Goldilocks economy for housing i.e. jobs and income continue to grow, interest rates remain at historically low levels, financing rules have become more flexible and inflation remains tame at below 2% annually. So what is the problem?

At present our inventory of new and existing homes is static with numbers similar to those found in the mid 1990’s a full 20+ years ago HOWEVER during those 20+ years the country’s population has expanded by 60M. Couple this with a mismatched market as home prices will not come down as long as there are buyers out there willing and able to spend more and more money for less and less house as we have witnessed in hot markets i.e. San Francisco Bay Area, The Northeast and other markets.

Longer term is my concern. We have witnessed locally in Denver our market moving from purchasers to renters. Good for investors not so good for individuals concerning personal wealth. Homeowners are known for making big-ticket purchases i.e. appliances and upkeep and maintenance sustains the construction sector i.e. additions, roofing and so forth.

If we move towards a renter oriented housing market fewer Americas will be able to save and grow their money associated with the ownership and upkeep of a personal owner-occupied residence. Due to demand rents may continue to rise (as less inventory on the market) and thus renters will have less disposable income to spend which will ripple through the economy beyond housing.

Yet Denver may be the litmus test for the national economy as follows:

Upper-End of the Market: is slowing dramatically as prices rose to fast and thus not sustainable. Upper-end buyers are usually market savvy and thus will be more cautious entering the market. Even in the Country Club neighborhood I have witnessed price-drops and re-listings at lower prices all in an effort to generate activity; would have been rare one year ago

Lower-End of the Market: Supply is outstripping demand with the average home in Metro Denver over $410K; yet incomes/wages have not kept up as the average worker is slowly being shut out of the market and thus will be a perpetual renter,

Rentals: The vast majority of new rental buildings are priced at luxury levels (just look at the cranes in Cherry Creek North). Yet that market is slowing and many of the existing buildings are struggling to attract tenants and now offering rental incentives. Yet additional buildings continue to come out of the ground.

Zoning and Entitlements: In Denver while zoning has allowed additional density and not without controversy i.e. slot homes in Cherry Creek, while beneficial to rental development, most rentals are oriented to single and couple households, with few exceptions most new multi-family buildings are not designed for families or larger households.

The above is just some food for thought. Add an existential crisis and this housing “House of Cards” may come to an ugly resolution. While I am not predicting another housing crash, the off-balance market is not sustainable and the overall repercussions to the overall economy have not been considered, quite dangerous.

As a Buyer What Your Broker Wants You to Know

As the real estate market in Metro Denver slows or as many of us believe moves towards a more balanced market between sellers and buyers, choices and opportunities will expand for all in the marketplace. In discussing market conditions with peer brokers we began to discuss what we desire the buyers we represent to know before and during their house hunt.

Knowing One’s Budget and Realistic Expectations: One of the issues related to historically low interest/borrowing rates is buyers are looking at a monthly payment versus actual valuations. Coupled with low down payments in an up valuation market this is not an issue. However in a traditional market when a 2% appreciation may be considered healthy i.e. matching inflation such a pro-forma can be an issue when one believes homes should rise 10%, 15% or 20% per year as the norm and may be projecting such a forecast into their future planning.

What most brokers (including me) suggest is to immediately us a home affordability calculator. While not perfect this tool will allow prospective buyers to have a general baseline concerning affordability i.e. a budget and price range. The second step we suggest is to secure a mortgage pre-approval letter; a process involves a lender reviewing a client’s finances and determining how much it’s willing to loan for a home. No matter the market listing brokers and their clients i.e. sellers understand a pre-approval (not to be confused with a pre-qualified) letter shows intent and seriousness. Finally we look at smaller yet potential challenges i.e. real estate taxes, upkeep/maintenance costs and lifestyle i.e. condo, single-family residence and other factors which may not be part of the initial calculus concerning home ownership.

Do Not Contact the Listing Agent: As brokers we know with the Internet and other marketing tools information about a listing is ubiquitous. And yes the Listing Agent would probably be the most knowledgeable about the residence he/she is selling. Of note, the information provided on the web through various distribution channels is only as accurate as the original input.

Yet the Listing Agent is the advocate for the seller. As a buyer it is important to communicate through your buyer-broker whose fiduciary interest is to you. By allowing us, your buyer broker to interface with the selling broker we are showing A) you are represented by a knowledgeable and competent professional and B) We have a strong working relationship. When one contacts the listing broker directly this can undermine the working relationship AND place a buyer in a secondary position with the Listing Broker whose fiduciary duty is to their seller (unless one becomes a Transaction Broker which is rare).

 Silence is Golden: On the rare occasions I host an open house I am always amused at the conversations I overhear. It is similar to the home-flipping shows in which a hidden camera and microphone are set up to capture before and after comments (I will not opine on the ethics of such actions). Yes as brokers we ask probing questions i.e. are you working with a broker? How many houses have your looked at? Any general impressions you would like to share and so forth. If I am listing the house I am representing the seller and the questions I am asking will facilitate my marketing efforts. However the answers may provide insight concerning the prospective buyer; information you may not wish to share except with your buyer broker i.e. motivations, budget, timing and so forth. This is truly proprietary and should only be shared with your buyer broker.

Thus (and a lot of brokers will be angry with me), when attending an Open House please keep your comments beyond ear shot at a minimum. In WWII there was a quote “loose lips sink ships”; while not as dire, go against human nature and discuss the home outside or be sure you are out of hearing range of the broker or their confederates. Even better see if your buyer broker is available to attend with you or set a private showing with your broker so you can discuss the home sans others overhearing.

Trust Your Broker; The Internet is Not Truly WYSIWYG: I actually enjoy when my client’s forward listings they have found on the Internet and I am one of the few. Their actions suggest to me they are serious and doing research. Yet I also understand the frustration of brokers. Many clients will send every listing within a 50 mile radius or similar. A few tips:

  • WYSIWYG: Known as What You See Is What You Get is not necessarily true. Listings on the Internet like most marketing channels are promoting the finest attributes of the property. Do you really believe the listing broker is going to post a picture of the freeway adjacent to the home or the junkyard across the alley? Of course not! Tip: if there are a limited number of pictures or pictures of the neighborhood dominate I would be more skeptical. Even the smallest of residences have a wealth of images available. The reality is your broker probably knows the neighborhood, possibly the residence and has access to information from title companies, assessors records and other sources to provide a truly balanced picture of the residence on the market.

 

  • Billboarding: It is amazing when you input an address of a home for sale and the results include every broker in the market showing the listing. With today’s technology when a listing is loaded into the local multilist service with few exceptions the information is distributed to multiple channels. Thus the information is now in the public domain. Of note my firm is even more proactive as we have a company intranet, which promotes our our listings to our offices worldwide if we wish. The issue is the information presented in the public domain may be inaccurate.

For example my personal residence, which I sold and closed in April 2017 continues showing as “For Sale” on multiple sites including one of the most popular valuation sites 5 months after closing. I once had a listing which was presented on a “Owner Will Carry” site sans my permission; all the calls I received were from prospective buyers looking for a specific product i.e. an owner will carry option, unfortunately a financing method my client would not entertain. The service billboarding the listing was doing a disservice to their clients many who paid for access to this supposed proprietary list of residences available with a seller who is willing to carry a mortgage.

  • Your Broker is In the Know: Your broker will have access to the most up-to-date information and as mentioned prior is your advocate and communication channel with the listing broker and their seller client. Even if a property is Under Contract your broker can inquire if the seller is entertaining back-ups, if the existing contract may fall through and so forth. Thus use your broker and their experience and expertise to your fullest advantage.

Fear of Commitment: I am probably one of the rare brokers who has not continually bought and sold during their career for their own account. Readers of my blog know I was in my previous residence for 27.5 year! This has to do more with not a big fan of change and it was and still is a great residence yet my lifestyle changed. I do, as most brokers do understand the purchasing of a house is a big commitment and not one to be taken lightly.

Buying a house, especially one’s first residence is a big step and commitment. As part of our client review and why we request pre-approval letters and so forth is a sense of commitment from our clients as in general brokers are not compensated unless a transaction closes. We also understand life presents us all challenges as no one’s employment is ironclad and other issues can question one’s commitment concerning home purchase into doubt. Yet with careful planning and foresight coupled with communication, commitment phobia can be curtailed.

As I advise clients a residence is not necessarily a ball and chain (and trust me there is the same look every one has when they review the mortgage repayment schedule at closing, I call it the Ball and Chain look). There are always options from resale to rental to refinancing and so forth.

An acquaintance I met while walking in my neighborhood one day mentioned a unique situation; she is single, a senior citizen with a larger home yet straddled with a sub-prime mortgage and job loss. If she sold her home; even with a strong market the proceeds would just cover the outstanding mortgage and penalties accrued over the past 6 months. Thus her credit report would be healthier yet she would be homeless.

As an acquaintance and not a broker we discussed and I suggested checking out the following blog on Seniorly concerning programs for seniors looking for roommates or housing. The upside for the owner of the home, the opportunity to collect some income, dig herself out of the financial hole and have a peer in residence. While not for everyone a viable alternative to selling and having no equity to fall back on or worse, foreclosure and being forced from the house.

As Brokers we are truly your advocates. As there some bad apples out there? Of course just as in any profession. However the vast majority of brokers I know and trust are those who truly look out for their client’s best interest and desire to build long-term relationships and a referral network based on honest quality service.

Happy House Hunting.

Is Irrational Exuberance Giving Way to Rational Behavior

I recently enjoyed a conversation with a friend who is about to list their residence in one of Denver’s most affluent neighborhoods (of note I was NOT in the competition for the listing). He mentioned what they plan to list the home at. I asked if they were planning to use the broker whom they have a personal relationship with and they advised no as what they wish to list the home at, the broker would not take the listing feeling the asking price was overly aggressive. Another broker has since been retained to market and sell the home.

Full disclosure, the home is spectacular from a conservative design perspective including solid pre-war construction, beautiful curb appeal, and a park-like oversized lot professionally landscaped and so forth. Of course there are some minor deficiencies yet nothing insurmountable. However when I was advised of the asking price my immediate reaction based on my experience in the present market was “Good Luck”.

I personally went through a similar situation with clients in 2011. Due to a change in employment status and other factors including owning the largest home on the block purchased at an inflated 2006 price, a challenging layout  and across the alley from a primary school  the sellers and this home had multiple challenges. At the Listing Presentation with a peer broker in attendance we advised the seller the asking price should be between $710,000-$720,000. The seller requested I place the house on the market for $839,000 (their purchase price was over $800K plus interior upgrades leading to a cost-basis in excess of $840,000). As a friend first and broker second (and I have since learned my lesson) I did as requested. After one month, multiple open-houses and two formal showings the sellers agreed to lower the price. The new asking $739,000, still above what was advised the prior month. Fifty yes 50 showings later and 9 months on the market not one offer! We decided to part ways. The seller hired another broker, within one week did a price reduction and subsequently sold the residence for $715,000.

It took the seller ten(10) months to sell for $715,000 which I had advised, from day one AND at $4,000/month mortgage, do the math, $40,000 before interest deduction, not exactly the most brilliant strategy.

Thus based on the above examples and seeing signs of a slowing market and for my own edification I decided to look at market activity both present and looking back at Sold Activity over the past 6 months.

Let’s start with Country Club (the borders are from Downing St. to west-side of University Blvd, 1st Avenue to 6th Avenue).

Sales Activity over the last 6 Months Country Club Neighborhood of Denver:

  • # Of homes sold: 7
  • Avg. Finished SF: 3,510 SF
  • Avg. Total SF: 4,482 SF
  • Average Sold PSF Finished: $568.38
  • Average Sold PSF Total: $445.01
  • Average Days on Market: 24 Days

On the Market at Present:

  •  # Of homes on the market: 8
  • Avg. Finished SF: 3,186 SF
  • Avg. Total SF: 4,419 SF
  • Average Sold PSF Finished: $557.31
  • Average Sold PSF Total: $424.36
  • Average Days on Market: 68 Days and counting

Based on size the differences between the Sold’s and on market is marginal and same concerning the Price per Square Foot however what is telling is Days on Market (DOM). The Sold’s over the last 6 months on average sold in 24 days. Yet those on the market today is average 68 days and counting. The difference, over one month, almost a month and a half.

I admit one could argue the homes on the market at present may have challenges from location to upkeep however as asking prices based on a Per Square Foot basis stayed relatively the same, the issue is the longer on market time. Number of days on market has more than doubled. Yes there are seasonal factors however many pundits argue the selling season is now year round.

My personal view is market demand is softening and asking prices are yet to adjust to the new market realities.

Of note, Country Club is a small, insular neighborhood with limited inventory and limited turnover. Thus I also looked at Cherry Creek North (1st Avenue to 6th Avenue, University Blvd to Colorado Blvd) to provide a more balanced view, granted however balanced one of the metro’ area’s most affluent neighborhoods can be. However with the diverse housing stock and density, a clearer picture may emerge.

Sales Activity over the last 6 Months Cherry Creek North Neighborhood of Denver:

  •  # Of homes sold: 53
  • Avg. Finished SF: 2,396 SF
  • Avg. Total SF: 3,335 SF
  • Average Sold PSF Finished: $436.10
  • Average Sold PSF Total: $332.28
  • Average Days on Market: 53 Days

On the Market at Present:

  •  # Of homes on the market: 94
  • Avg. Finished SF: 2,393 SF
  • Avg. Total SF: 3,416 SF
  • Average Sold PSF Finished: $595.36
  • Average Sold PSF Total: $412.07
  • Average Days on Market: 95 Days and counting

Again as with Country Club based on size the differences between the Sold’s and on market is marginal and same concerning the Price per Square Foot however what is telling again is Days on Market (DOM). The Sold’s over the last 6 months on average sold in 53 days. Yet those on the market today is average 95 days and counting. As with Country Club the difference is almost a month and a half.

Conclusion: In both neighborhoods asking and closed prices have stayed somewhat status quo. However in a hot housing market the number of days on market is telling. Granted one could use the seasonal differential argument. Maybe; however in both neighborhoods we are seeing the Days of Market mirror each other i.e. almost a month and a half difference.

I may be incorrect and I admit when I am however I believe the market is definitely showing signs of slowing based on Days on Market coupled with levels of inventory. Yes the two markets are considered luxury markets yet what happens at the upper-end of the market historically trickles down to other market segments. What will be interesting is when we will begin witnessing price adjustments.

It seems the pinnacle of the market may have been 6-12 months prior and the market is now possibly taking a well-deserved breather or maybe showing signs of a changing business cycle.

Considering interest rates have remained stable; actually still close to historic lows, the stock market continues to flirt with record highs and the recent issues with N. Korea are too recent to influence the housing market.

I believe the optimists will advise it is a natural seasonal shift, me being the conservative pessimist would advise, hang tight if you can it may be a bumpy ride ahead.

 

 

 

 

 

Opportunity Knocks in Cherry Creek North

Even in an overheated market opportunity knocks.

Every day I scan www.REColorado.com which is the MLS for Denver metro concerning potential opportunities including new listings, price adjustments and days of market. If the property is priced correctly and within a desirable area it will usually go under contract within days if not hours due to pent up demand and limited supply.

As many of my readers know I too am in the market as I sold my primary residence a few months back. However unlike many I have the luxury of living in what I hope is a temporary situation with below market rent thus I am willing to wait out the market. And while I may be incorrect; I believe the market will continue to slow in the middle to upper price ranges. While I am not suggesting a hard fall; existential issues may happen i.e. world events, interest rates and a getting long in the tooth bull market in equities…..my personal view business cycles have not ended and memories are short.

Yet for those looking long term I wanted to provide some real examples of properties presently for sale that have languished on the market yet may provide a good opportunity for someone looking longer term.

Cherry Creek North (1st Ave to 6th Ave, University Blvd to Colorado Blvd): Arguably one of the most in-demand neighborhoods in Denver with asking prices to match. Between the shopping district, The Cherry Creek Shopping Center coupled with easy access to Safeway,  Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s and a diversity of housing styles all within close proximity of downtown, its true location, location, location.

I pulled some statistics as follows:

Sold over the last 6 months:

Average Sales Price: $941,000

Per Sq. Ft. Above Grade: $447.73

Total Per Sq. Ft. i.e. including basement/unfinished: $340.39

On Market at Present:

Average Asking Price: $1,085.000

Per Sq. Ft. Above Grade: $484.83

Total Per Sq. Ft. i.e. including basement/unfinished: $394.84

Granted the numbers above may be skewed due to larger homes, new construction and of course location, location, location. However there are a few bargains available. Please note I have provided “my prediction” concerning closing sale price. This is just my personal forecast as I have no relationship with the sellers or the brokers listing the units and thus have no idea concerning motivations. Thus consider my predictions based on if I was representing a buyer and they asked me what they should offer and eventually close at.

525 Jackson Street: Located in the eastern part of the neighborhood 525 Jackson Street is a smaller 28 unit condo building on the NWC of 5th Avenue and Jackson Street, a pretty tree-lined quiet block. Built in the 1940’s the building is basic with some art moderne elements i.e. glass blocks illuminate the stairs (it is a 3-story walk up). The condos have nice expansive layouts, many closets and off-street parking, individual storage units plus a laundry/bike room.

At present there are two units for sale. Of note some of the challenges for some include no rentals allowed i.e. investors need not look. Per the bylaws there are various restrictions concerning air conditioners. There are no amenities beyond off-street parking, individual storage units and the laundry/bike room. Yet the building (new windows) and grounds (professionally maintained) fit right in with Cherry Creek’s streetscape.

525 Jackson Street #102: This is a smaller 2BD/1BA with 814 SF. The unit has been renovated including granite countertops, a designer bathroom and a unique tin ceiling in the master bedroom. Hardwood floors and ample east sun filtered through mature landscaping. This is a charming unit with an easy layout. Some may object to the 1st floor location and the smaller size, however at $350 PSF with an asking of $285,000 one can afford the Cherry Creek lifestyle for an entry-level price. My prediction concerning closing sale price: $250-$265.

525 Jackson Street #209: This is a larger 2BD/1BA with 917 SF. The unit has been partially renovated with a nice open kitchen. The bathroom is closer to original. It is a corner unit thus nice cross ventilation as it faces north and east. Windows have custom shutters, there are ample closets including 2 walk-ins and 3 hallway and off-street deeded parking. Asking is $299,000 or $326 PSF. My prediction for closing sale price: $270-$285.

Of note the last resale was unit #306, top floor (a walk-up building), nicely renovated including interior swamp cooler vent from the building common area system. An expansive 600 SF one bedroom which was asking $250K and sold for $255K in June 2017. The interior design and finishes were truly top-notch.

264 Harrison Street: A fourplex row house this complex is unique as it is a row house thus no common HOA fees; each unit is fee-simple and sits on its own tax lot. 264 Harrison has been through multiple and dramatic price adjustments. This is not a row house for everyone. The positives are the 2-car attached garage, modern, timeless design by a well-respected firm, Arquitectonica and a unique multi-split level design with the 2 bedrooms, one located on the 1st level, the master on the 3rd level and the middle level constituting the entertaining areas. There is a small private backyard and a balcony off the kitchen. The challenge with this unit is its location; the rear is adjacent to Colorado Boulevard (yet there is a 6′ brick sound wall  coupled with mature landscaping). The interior is dated including the appliances and cabinetry original 1984 with an interior palette of colors more associated with Santa Fe versus Denver. At present asking $474,950 or $287.85 down from $549,900. The value play, the neighboring unit 266 Harrison sold for $535,000 in April 2017. Granted it was completely renovated including updated interior including granite kitchen and Kitchen-Aid appliances, mechanicals, new windows, gas fireplace, built-in surround sound system, rear landscaping and so forth. However if one is willing to invest some dollars into renovation the value is there. Also sans HOA fees additional affordability and no restrictions concerning rentals. Please note I am in total disagreement with Zillow’s valuation of $501K which I assume is based on the sale of neighboring 266 Harrison. My prediction for closing sale price: $415-$440.

149 Harrison Street: Located on the west-side of Harrison Street i.e. not on Colorado Boulevard, a true single-family home for under $1,000,000 in Cherry Creek North. Originally a duplex and part of a larger 4-plex development the two units were combined and the lot separated allowing for a true single-family home on a standard 50’ x 125’ lot back in 2012. This home is not for everyone as 1) it is a ranch thus no basement or 2nd level. While offering 3 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms it is within a tight 1,826 SF. The yard is fenced in; there is a 2-car garage. However for comparable pricing of townhomes on the 100 block of Harrison Street one can own a single-family and the lot value (closer to the main business district similar lots are asking $900K). Yes there is a discount for being on Harrison Street across from Colorado Blvd and the eastern part of the neighborhood. However for a true SF home, renovated, newer mechanicals and materials all for $764,900 or $419 PSF down from $795,000, may be a good option for the buyer who desires a true unattached residence and possible future equity appreciation due to the lot with its G-RH3 zoning. My prediction for closing sale price: $725-$740.

Happy Hunting

July 2017 Statistics Show The Denver Real Estate Market Is Cooling

And this is not necessarily negative. Recently I have been blogging both statistical and anecdotal information about the Metro Denver housing market. I have predicted a slow down as I noticed activity in the upper-end luxury tier of market i.e. $1M and up was softening. From experience this segment of the market is usually first to show signs of the direction of future trends as it is the segment of the market that is least dependent on external influences including mortgage rates, liquidity, household income, employment levels and inventory issues.

In addition there haven been signs of a possible formation of a bubble concerning real estate in metro Denver including continued rising prices and a wider divergence concerning affordability and inventory.

One of my first reads each morning is the REColorado.com site  (an excellent source the most accurate information for both consumers and brokers) which is the Multilist service and keeper of statistics for Metro Denver Real Estate. The following is copied from their site in “italicized quotes“:

The latest data from REcolorado shows the eleven-county Denver metro real estate market experienced a summer cooldown across most major housing indicators.”

Granted a summer cool down is relative as while average prices dropped one(1%) percent from the prior month Metro Denver prices are still 10% higher year over year. And while inventory expanded (6 weeks of inventory, up one week) it is still at close to historic lows and we are witnessing more activity in the upper end of the market with homes at $700K+ accounting for 9% of the market (which in turn skews the average sales price which would be lower if upper-end sales were less of a factor concerning volume). While one month does not make a viable trend line the signs of movement towards a flattening or potential adjustment of the overall residential real estate  to the downside are not deniable.

Home prices in the greater Denver Metro area decreased for the first time since February. In July, the average sold price of a single-family home was $444,108, one percent lower than last month. Average home sale prices are still 10 percent higher than this time last year. As compared to last month, the average price of a single family detached home remained relatively unchanged, while the average price for a condo/townhome decreased by nearly three percent.

In July, we saw a seasonal decrease in sales, which is typically brought on by the July 4th holiday and summer vacations. Throughout the month, 4,697 homes sold, down 20 percent as compared to last month and 11 percent lower than this time last year.

Home sales were strongest in the $300,00 to $500,000 price range, where nearly half of all July home sales took place. Sales of higher-priced homes are becoming more common across the greater Denver Metro area. In July, sales of homes priced $700,000 and above comprised nine percent of all sales.

Inventory levels remain tight, as new listings of homes for sale fell 15 percent from June and were down four percent from a year ago. Still, the number of available homes for sale is maintaining at levels we saw earlier this year. July ended with 6,450 active listings of homes for sale, seven percent lower than the 2017 peak, which was reached in June.

At the current sales rate, there is six weeks of inventory, up one week as compared to June.

Homes continue to move quickly, especially in the counties with average home prices in the $300,000 to $400,000 price range. In July, homes spent an average of 22 days on the market, two days more than last month. In Adams and Arapahoe Counties, homes were on the market an average of just 17 days. Broomfield County saw the lowest days on market, at 15 days.”

Head and Shoulder Pattern in Denver Real Estate

As readers of my blog know I am somewhat a statistician as I look at various statistical measurements including the well respected Case-Shiller index concerning housing costs. Please note statistics are similar to an appraisal; they are a look back and not necessarily a look forward. I also believe history repeats itself as I have been a broker for 20+ years and have watched with interest the effects of business cycles on our real estate market.

Please note I am not advocating the following analysis concerning a Head and Shoulders pattern adopted from the stock market HOWEVER housing prices in general trend with the stock market. Thus reviewing the latest statistics and graph patterns I noticed a head and shoulders pattern-taking place in the Denver (and other) housing markets: The following is a graphic of a Head And Shoulders Bottom as related to equities:

H_and_s_bottom_new

Per Wikipedia: This formation (Head & Shoulders Bottom) is simply the inverse of a Head and Shoulders Top and often indicates a change in the trend and the sentiment. The formation is upside down in which volume pattern is different from a Head and Shoulder Top. Prices move up from first low with increase volume up to a level to complete the left shoulder formation and then falls down to a new low. It follows by a recovery move that is marked by somewhat more volume than seen before to complete the head formation. A corrective reaction on low volume occurs to start formation of the right shoulder and then a sharp move up that must be on quite heavy volume breaks though the neckline.

Another difference between the Head and Shoulders Top and Bottom is that the Top Formations are completed in a few weeks, whereas a Major Bottom (Left, right shoulder or the head) usually takes a longer, and as observed, may prolong for a period of several months or sometimes more than a year.

Screen Shot 2017-08-11 at 8.41.30 AM

In May 2017 according to the Case Shiller index the average home price in Denver reached $456,100 which is 41%+ higher than the previous peak experienced in Denver in August 2006 which many will remember was the pinnacle before descent into the Great Recession.

While the graph is not the easiest to comprehend yet the visual is strikingly similar to the Head and Shoulders Bottom, the following is the pricing and trend over a 17-year period, which I have mentioned in previous blog posts including the pricing history and activity of a home in Country Club.

  • 17 years: Average Annual Increase: 5.8%
  • 10 Years: Average Annual Increase: 4.6%
  • 3 Years Average Annual Increase: 10%
  • 1 Year Average Annual Increase: 7.9%

The average cost of a home in Denver throughout the past 17 years:

  • 2000: $230,000
  • 2007: $313,500
  • 2010: $290,000
  • 2014: $350,900
  • 2016: $422,800
  • 2017: $456,100

Are times and trends different from the Great Recession at present? Yes. Lending standards have tightened, sub-prime lending seems to be under control and we continue to be in a Goldilocks Interest Rate environment.

However just on a business cycle trend I have some concern and this does not include outside influences i.e. saber rattling concerning North Korea which impacted the equity markets worldwide yesterday with the largest point downtown since May 17th, 2017.

I am not a market forecaster however based on the statistics and graphs presented in this blog my level of concern for a retrenchment in prices is ratcheting upward. We are witnessing price adjustments in the upper-end of the market and if interest rates were to increase we would see affordability challenged further and average prices go down. Not necessity a negative as we continue to be in a seller’s market and average buyers are challenged concerning affordability and inventory, not a positive long-term trend for our housing market. I am not making any predictions, just showing statistics and voicing some concern.

 

 

Is A Real Estate Bubble in Colorado’s Immediate Future

Many of my real estate peers continue to bask in the glory of this continued bull market in Metro Denver. I understand this as both personally and professionally I too am frustrated with the lack of inventory; a marketplace which continues to show a demand side bias seemingly unabated.

Yes I have been accused of being a pessimist. As I advise I have been in this business for 20 plus years AND been a resident of the State of Colorado since 1984. Thus I have been through a few business cycles and was fortunate to purchase the home I just sold back in 1989 as Denver was coming out of a commodities influenced regional recession which was a catalyst for Denver’s now more diversified economy.

This morning, during my scan of the headlines a story came across the wires; this one relates to states with potential real estate bubbles. Posted on AOL Finance the article mentions 8 states in which a real estate bubble may be forming.

Per the article and quoted as follows it is important to understand “Today, most experts agree that, on a national level, we are not in a real estate bubble. The absence of nationwide or statewide housing bubbles doesn’t mean they’re not forming, however, or that they don’t already exist within some states on a more local level.”

The States mentioned in the article are California, Texas, Florida, Washington Tennessee, Colorado Oregon, and Nevada. On the national level due to changes in mortgage requirements and desires for home ownership we have witnessed income to house value ratios increase. Historically from 1950-2000, median home values have been roughly 2.2 times the median income. Today, that number is roughly 3.36 times higher, 50 percent higher than the historical average. Granted there are more choices concerning mortgage instruments and our society in general has collectively accepted the concept and use of leverage. We now know leverage and inflated valuations led to the most recent Great Recession. Unlike the Depression of the 1930’s which was particially caused by a bubble in tradable equities, The Great Recession began with a housing bubble as housing was and continues to be viewed as an investment vehicle and thus being leveraged.

Driving through Cherry Creek North and Downtown and seeing the cranes on the horizon coupled with the frenzied construction activity all along the Front Range from the Foothills to the Plains, I am starting to be concerned. A low-interest rate, high-demand environment must at some point correct, when is the question:

The following is excerpted from the AOL Finance article:

Colorado’s housing market is overvalued, according to Fitch Ratings. But why is overvaluation important to real estate bubbles?

People believe that the asset, often real estate, is going to become more and more valuable in the future. If it becomes more valuable because it produces more income, that is one thing,” said David Reiss, a real estate expert and law professor at Brooklyn Law School. But if it becomes more valuable just because people think it is going to become even more valuable, that is another. At some point, the merry go round stops and the current owners are left with an asset worth less than what they purchased it for.

In Colorado, home prices in major markets like Fort Collins and Boulder are not just overvalued, they’re more overvalued than they had been at their peak during the 2005-2006 housing bubble, hardly an encouraging sign. Making matters worse, incomes are failing to keep up with rising price.

Several Colorado metro areas are seeing price-to-income ratios above both the national level and their historic averages. The median home price in Denver and Fort Collins are roughly five-times the median income. In Boulder, the home price-to-income ratio is even higher at 6.6 and is more than 100 percent higher than the historic average.

To be clear, high home prices don’t necessarily equate to a bubble, said Jeff Shaffer of McKinley Partners, a real estate private equity firm. “A typical bubble starts with high prices causing capital to start flowing quickly into that space because of attractive returns. So high housing prices may spur a bubble down the road, especially in markets like Denver, where you see a lot of new home development in the pipeline to open up,” he said.

According to RealtyTrac, a real estate information company and an online marketplace for foreclosed and defaulted properties, Denver County has the nation’s lowest affordability index as of second quarter 2017, meaning it has the least affordable prices compared to historical averages. Adams County and Arapahoe County, both in the Denver metro area, also rank among the worst for housing affordability.

Personally I am more concerned about the Front Range versus the State of Colorado. Yes our resort communities are very dependent on real estate transactions for transfer taxes and so forth. However I am not seeing the frenzied activity west of the Continental Divide that I see on the Front Range. Thus if a bubble is forming, I believe it may be Front Range specific and while impacting the whole state if it bursts, the damage I believe will be most acute along the I-25 corridor from the Wyoming border to Pueblo.